How to grow snapdragons

Are you looking for a fun and easy way to add some color to your garden? If so, you should consider growing snapdragons. Snapdragon plants are beautiful and relatively easy to care for, making them a great option for novice gardeners. In this post, we will discuss the basics of growing snapdragons and provide tips on how to ensure that your plants thrive. So read on to learn more!

Where to grow snapdragons:

-Sun to partial sun.

-Prefers rich, well-draining soil with a pH of 6.0 in full sunlight.

Snapdragon plants have a long blooming season that begins in early spring and lasts until late fall. They grow best in areas that receive at least six hours of daily sun exposure and prefer to be kept moist but not wet. Therefore, it is important to plant snapdragons in beds or containers with good drainage so the soil does not become waterlogged, which can cause root rot. Snapdragons also do well when planted near other flowering plants because they attract bees and butterflies which will help pollinate your garden.

How to Plant Snapdragons:

Snapdragon plants can be grown from seeds or purchased as potted plants. To start growing snapdragons from seed, sow indoors 5 weeks before the last expected frost date in springtime at a depth of ΒΌ inch. Keep temperatures between 60- and 70-degrees Fahrenheit during germination which should occur within 7 to 15 days after sowing. Once seedlings have developed leaves, increase humidity levels by placing containers on trays filled with pebbles that contain water below the base of seedlings. After the first true leaves have formed, the plants should be moved into larger containers that have good drainage and spaced 12 to 16 inches apart.

Propagating snapdragons:

-Another way to grow snapdragon plants is by dividing the roots of established plants in springtime. To do this, dig up an entire plant with at least three or four stems with root balls intact. Space new snapdragons 16 inches apart and make sure they receive adequate water.

-To remove rooted offsets from parent plants, simply snip them off carefully using sharp shears or garden clippers. New potted “volunteers” can be planted out after all risk of frost has passed and nighttime temperatures remain above 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

Snapdragons: problem solving

-The most common problems associated with growing snapdragons include root rot, powdery mildew and viruses.

-Root Rot: Snapdragons are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important not to allow soil to become waterlogged. If you notice the foliage of your snapdragon plants begin to turn yellow after periods of heavy rainfall or high humidity, dig up and divide affected plants immediately and replant them in well-draining soil. To avoid this problem altogether, plant snapdragons in containers with good drainage or raised beds filled with a mixture of topsoil and compost.

-Powdery Mildew: The leaves of infected snapdragon plants will develop white patches that eventually lead to leaf drop as the disease progresses. This disease can be prevented by avoiding overhead sprinkling or watering since this creates favorable conditions for the spread of the fungus. If conditions are too wet, increase airflow around plants and use a fungicide to get rid of any existing mildew.

-Viruses: Viral diseases may result in distorted leaves that become mottled with yellow spots which eventually turn brown. This causes the plant to die so it is important not to propagate snapdragons from infected plants since they are likely carriers of these diseases. Additionally, remove any dying plants from the garden immediately so other snapdragons do not become contaminated with virus particles.

Reasons why snapdragons don’t bloom:

-When the flowers of your snapdragon plants have not opened even though the plant has been in full sunlight for several weeks, it is likely because the soil is too dry. Stop watering until you see new growth emerge, then begin watering regularly again to help stimulate flower blooming.

-If your snapdragon plants have not started to develop buds or open their flowers, check that there is enough light exposure where they are being grown. If they receive less than six hours of daily sun exposure, move them to a place with more sun as lack of light is also a common cause of delayed blooming.

-Wait until the weather warms up in early springtime to move snapdragon plants outdoors since cool temperatures can often delay flowering even further. If your flowers are still not opening after moving them into warmer conditions, wait for two or three weeks before worrying that there may be another problem with your snapdragon plants.

-If your snapdragon plant has stopped blooming but new growth has emerged, make sure it receives enough water and sunlight since too much stress will also inhibit flowering. Once you see new buds appear on the plant, reduce watering to promote blossoming which should take place within one to two months when all conditions are optimal.

Snapdragon varieties to try:

-Drumstick (Antirrhinum majus) produces masses of white, pink, or red blossoms on long, wiry stems.

-Florist’s Snapdragon has double flowers that are perfect for cut flowers since they open quickly and last longer. These plants grow to be about 18 inches tall on sturdy stems ideal for cutting.

-Marine or Seafoam Spike is a tender annual with soft green foliage and pink blossoms on long flower spikes blooming from spring until fall. This plant grows up to 2 feet high with 18-inch flower stalks making it an attractive addition to borders or beds where height is not desired.

-Mixed color Queen of the Andes has two-inch-wide blossoms consisting of red, white or orange petals surrounding a burnt-orange cone with black spots. This annual grows best in containers but is also drought resistant which makes it easy to care for.

-Red Snapdragon has red flowers on short, stocky stems perfect for adding color to borders or beds that are only 18 inches tall. These blooms look striking when paired with white snapdragons since they contrast each other beautifully.

-Tall single purple Queen of Night produces long lasting blossoms that start out as dark pink and transform into lavender hues as the flower matures. This plant grows to be about 3 feet high with ruffled blooms opening at night so plan this one for evening gardens where you can enjoy its showy display!

Conclusions:

-Snapdragons are relatively easy to grow and will tolerate most conditions, but they are especially susceptible to root rot. To avoid this problem altogether, plant snapdragons in containers with good drainage or raised beds filled with a mixture of topsoil and compost.

-Be sure that snapdragons have enough light exposure since too little light is also a common cause of delayed blooming. If your flowers are still not opening after moving them into warmer conditions, wait for two or three weeks before worrying that there may be another problem with your snapdragon plants.

Leave a Comment